Building a rain garden

Mud puddle is getting a makeover, and backyard is getting runoff relief.

By Maris Lawyer (Posted April 14, 2019):

There are grand plans for this bald patch of clay, which fills with water whenever it rains. Check back in a few weeks to see the progress.

SynTerra is uniquely qualified to provide storm water management services. Our experts design solutions that meet business objectives while protecting public and environmental health. There can be a lot at stake and the work is best left to professionals like ours, but the concepts behind storm water management aren’t only applicable to large-scale projects.

Homeowners can implement storm water management practices on their own property, and that’s what I’m planning to do at my own home by creating a rain garden. You don’t have to be an engineer to treat storm water runoff at home.

When funneled off non-porous surfaces (roofs, sidewalks, driveways, etc.), storm water runoff can result in erosion or pollution. Those non-porous surfaces are a feature of every neighborhood, and chances are you can find evidence of storm water runoff around your gutters and in the soil surrounding your driveway. We’re just about all vulnerable to damages. Creating a rain garden is a naturally attractive solution that allows excess storm water to filter back down to a groundwater reserve instead of causing erosion and flooding above ground.

I have a clear candidate for a rain garden space in my backyard, where this bald patch of clay fills with water whenever it rains. You can see how my backyard already has a natural slope to it, so the space is practically begging to be developed into a rain garden.

Building a rain garden involves some simple landscaping, and selecting native plants that are good at absorbing excess water and creating a natural biome for wildlife. My own rain garden is underway, and I’ll soon be selecting plants as the weather grows warmer. In the coming weeks, be on the lookout for a second blog post detailing my rain garden creation step-by-step. With time, I hope to transform the ugly, muddy puddle in my backyard into a thriving rain garden.